google.com, pub-3692889070668435, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0 My Woodpeckers of Thailand

My Woodpeckers of Thailand

Updated: May 31

A brief overview of the woodpeckers of Thailand and pictures of those I have photographed...

Eurasian Wryneck

The Eurasian Wryneck (Jynx torquilla) is a species of wryneck in the woodpecker family. This species mainly breeds in temperate regions of Europe and Asia. Most populations are migratory, wintering in tropical Africa and in southern Asia It is a bird of open countryside, woodland and orchards. Eurasian wrynecks measure about 16.5 cm (6.5 in) in length and have bills shorter and less dagger-like than those of other woodpeckers. Their upper parts are barred and mottled in shades of pale brown with rufous and blackish bars and wider black streaks. Their underparts are cream speckled and spotted with brown. These birds get their English name from their ability to turn their heads through almost 180 degrees. When disturbed at the nest, they use this snake-like head twisting and hissing as a threat display. This odd behaviour led to their use in witchcraft, hence to put a "jinx" on someone. A good place to find these birds is Pak Phli, Nakon Nayok province. My picture here was taken at Pak Phli.

The IUCN lists the Eurasian Wryneck as being of "Least Concern"

Eurasian Wryneck (Jynx torquilla)

Speckled Piculet

The Speckled Piculet (Picumnus innominatus) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. The male and female birds look alike. They have olive-green backs, with two white stripes on the side of their heads. The male bird has orange and brown on the forecrown. They have a creamy-white coloring below, with black spots. There is a dark green band near the eyes. It is found in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. Its natural habitats are boreal forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. It is found up to an altitude of about 2500m. It can also be found in bamboo jungles. They usually move about in pairs, on thin branches, and sometimes hang from the branch, upside-down. Their behavior is quite similar to that of woodpeckers. A good place to find these birds is Mae Wong National Park. My picture here was taken at Mae Wong NP.

The IUCN lists the Speckled Piculet as being of "Least Concern"

Speckled Piculet (Picumnus innominatus)

Rufous Piculet

The Rufous Piculet (Sasia abnormis) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. The upper parts are generally green tinted with bronze, and the underparts rufous, orange or cinnamon, with paler flanks. The mantle and back are olive, the wings are brownish above, and the underwings are buff. The sexes are different; the male has a yellow or golden patch on the forehead whereas the female has a bronze patch. The rufous piculet is native to tropical southeastern Asia. It’s typical habitat is dense humid secondary forests with tangled undergrowth, bamboo and rotting trees. It gleans scrupulously, probing into holes and pulling out insects with its long tongue. It sometimes works its way up a trunk in a crosswise fashion, making little flights so as to turn to face the other way. Their diet consists of ants, termites, small beetles, spiders and other small invertebrates. . A good place to find these birds is Sri Phang Nga National Park.

The IUCN lists the Rufous Piculet as being of "Least Concern"


White-browed Piculet

The White-browed Piculet (Sasia ochracea) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. Its natural habitats are temperate forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests at altitudes of up to 2,600 m. This small piculet has olive-green upper parts tinged with chestnut and grows to a length of up to 10 cm. The under parts are cinnamon or rufous, sometimes yellowish on the flanks. The stubby tail is blackish. The crown is green, and there is a white streak above and immediately behind the eye. Males have a small golden-yellow patch on the forehead which females lack. It forages in the understory layer not far above the ground, pecking and probing with its sharp beak. Its diet consists of small insects, ants, termites, spiders and other small invertebrates. Breeding takes place between March and July. A good place to find these birds is Kaeng Krachan National Park. My picture here was taken at Thai Phrachan NP.

The IUCN lists the White-browed Piculet as being of "Least Concern"

White-browed Piculet (Sasia ochracea)

Grey-and-buff Woodpecker

The grey-and-buff woodpecker (Hemicircus sordidus) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found in southern Thailand. Its natural habitats are lowland and montane tropical or subtropical moist broadleaf forests. The species has a plump body and short rounded tail, and grows to a length of about 13.5 cm (5.3 in). The head appears large because of the slender neck and the large, cone-shaped crest. The head is largely grey, with a fine white, wavy line running from the cheek to the mantle. In males the forehead is red and the crest grey, while in females, both are grey. Body upper parts and wings are blackish. Underparts are grey, the tail and underwing dark.The grey-and-buff woodpecker is usually seen singly or in pairs, but sometimes occurs in mixed species flocks foraging in the canopy. It mainly feeds by gleaning rather than by drilling into the wood, the diet consisting of insects and fruit. The breeding season is between December and July. This bird can be found at Hala-Bala Wildlife Sanctuary, Narathiwat.

The IUCN lists the grey-and-buff woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"



Heart-spotted Woodpecker

The Heart-spotted Woodpecker (Hemicircus canente) is a species of bird in the woodpecker family. They have a contrasting black and white pattern, a distinctively stubby body (15 – 17cm) with a large wedge-shaped head making them easy to identify while their frequent calling make them easy to detect as they forage for invertebrates under the bark of trees. They move about in pairs or small groups and are often found in mixed-species foraging flocks. A good place to find these birds is Kaeng Krachan and Nam Nao National Park. My picture here was taken at Nam Nao NP.

The IUCN lists the Heart-spotted woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Heart-spotted Woodpecker (Hemicircus canente)

Sunda Pygmy Woodpecker

The Sunda-pygmy Woodpecker (Yungipicus moluccensis), also known as the Sunda woodpecker, is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It can be found accidental in the south of Thailand. It is a small sized woodpecker (Size range: 11.5-12.5 cm). Greyish brown capped head; ear covers dark brown with two rather broad whitish grey bands narrowing towards neck. Upper parts greyish brown. Tail short and dark with white bands. Lores and throat white leading into dirty white underparts. Males have a reddish orange crown which is absent in females. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, subtropical or tropical mangrove forest. I have only once ever seen this bird at the Satun Mangroves. My picture here was taken at Satun Mangroves..

The IUCN lists the Sunda pygmy Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Sunda-pygmy Woodpecker (Yungipicus moluccensis)

Grey-capped Pygmy Woodpecker

The Grey-capped pygmy Woodpecker (Yungipicus canicapillus) is a bird species of the Picidae family. This is a small, dark woodpecker (13 – 15cm). It has unbarred central tail feathers and its dark buff underside has prominent dark streaking. The dark grey crown (with a red nape in males), strong black eyestripes, and thin dark malar stripes contrast with broad white supercilia and cheeks. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, subtropical or tropical mangrove forest, and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. It occurs across most of Thailand, but good places to find these birds are Huay Kha Kaeng WS and Mae Ping NP.

The IUCN lists the Grey-capped pygmy Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern" My picture here was taken at Ao Phang Nga

Grey-capped pygmy Woodpecker (Yungipicus canicapillus)

Yellow-crowned Woodpecker

The Yellow-crowned Woodpecker (Leiopicus mahrattensis) is a medium-small (17 - 19 cm), pale-headed, pied woodpecker. Upperparts black, heavily spotted and barred white. Underparts dark, streaked dingy white with red belly patch. Irregular brown cheek and neck patches. Female has yellowish crown and nape. In male nape scarlet and fore-crown yellow. The Yellow-crowned woodpecker is listed as (possibly) extinct in Thailand. A very informative article on this bird written by Phillip Round can be read here.. Please open in new tab. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303718725/download

The IUCN lists the Yellow-crowned Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"


Rufous-bellied Woodpecker

The Rufous-bellied Woodpecker (Dendrocopos hyperythrus) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It ranges in length from about 19 to 23 cm. The male has a red crown while the female has a black crown, speckled with white. Both sexes have a black mantle and back, while the wings are black barred with white. The upper tail is black, with some white barring on the outer two pairs of feathers. The face is white and the throat and underparts are a uniform cinnamon or rufous. The lower belly is black barred with white and the under-tail converts are red or pink. Thailand range is limited to mainly the north western extremes, with Mae Ping National Park being probably the best place to find this difficult to see woodpecker.

The IUCN lists the Rufous-bellied Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"


Freckle-breasted Woodpecker

The Freckle-breasted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos analis) or Spot-breasted Pied Woodpecker is a species of bird in the family Picidae. A medium-sized, pied woodpecker (17 – 18cm). The upper parts are black, and heavily barred with white, red vent, breast and belly buff with light flank barring and slight side streaking. Whitish cheeks partly bordered by black line. Crown red in male with orange forehead, black in female. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forest, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest. They are also found quite commonly in parks and urban areas.

Until recently generally treated as conspecific with The fulvous-breasted woodpecker (D. macei), but separated by its pale pink vs bright red vent, more extensive white barring on tail, lightly spotted breast vs dark-streaked breast and different voice.

The IUCN lists the Freckle-breasted Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Freckle-breasted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos analis)

Stripe-breasted Woodpecker

The Stripe-breasted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos atratus) is a species of bird in the woodpecker family, Picidae. It is found in north-western Thailand, mainly in montane evergreen forest, particularly pine and oak forest, but also the edges of deciduous forests. Adult length is between 21 and 22 cm (8.3 and 8.7 in). The upper parts are black heavily barred with white. The upper tail is black with some white markings on the outer feathers. The crown and nape are red in the male and black in the female. The face is whitish with a black moustache which unites with a stripe on the edge of the breast. The throat, breast and belly are greyish-yellow or greyish-buff, boldly streaked with black. The under tail coverts are red. Thailand range is limited to mainly the North West, with Mae Ping National Park being a good place to see this woodpecker. My picture here was taken at Doi Lang

The IUCN lists the Stripe-breasted Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Stripe-breasted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos atratus)

Crimson-breasted Woodpecker

The Crimson-breasted Woodpecker (Dryobates cathpharius) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. Adult length is around 17 cm. It can be only be found in the extreme north west of Thailand. The mantle, back and wings are black, with some white spotting and light barring on the wings and one larger white patch. The upper side of the tail is black with white barring on the outer feathers, and the underside is barred in black and white. The chin and throat are white, the central breast is red and the rest of the breast and belly are white or buff streaked with black, with a varying amount of red or pink near the vent. The forehead is white and the crown black, and the male has a red patch on the nape. A black streak extends from the malar region to the nape before continuing to the sides of the chest. The breeding season is in March to April. This bird can be found at Doi Lang in Chiang Mai. My picture here was taken at Doi Lang.

The IUCN lists the Crimson-breasted Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Crimson-breasted Woodpecker (Dryobates cathpharius)

Maroon Woodpecker

The Maroon Woodpecker (Blythipicus rubiginosus) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found in southern Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. Adult size around 23–24 cm. Male has dull olive-brown head, paler feather tips on forehead, crimson tips on side of nape, upper parts unbarred maroon chestnut. Female lacks crimson tips. This bird can be found from Sri Phang Nga NP down to Hala-Bala Wildlife Sanctuary, Narathiwat. My picture here was taken at Hala-Bala Wildlife Sanctuary

The IUCN lists the Maroon Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Maroon Woodpecker (Blythipicus rubiginosus)

Bay Woodpecker

The Bay Woodpecker (Blythipicus pyrrhotis) is a species of bird in the family Picidae.

It is found mainly in North West Thailand, but also seen at Kaeng Krachan NP. Its natural habitats are evergreen and mixed deciduous forest, and mixed bamboo forest. Adult size is around 26·5–30 cm. Male has dull brown crown, short crest and red nape patch with variable rufescent brown body and black barring. Female lacks red nape patch. Breeding March –June with nest-hole usually low down, at 1–4 m.

The IUCN lists the Bay Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Orange-backed Woodpecker

The Orange-backed Woodpecker (Reinwardtipicus validus) is a woodpecker found in southern Thailand. It is a member of the family Picidae. Adult size around 30cm. Male has Blackish upperparts with chestnut wingbars, a red crown and crest and red underparts with an orange line running down its back. Female has a darker brown crown and crest, greyish brown underparts and a whitish line running down back. . Its natural habitats are primary or secondary evergreen rainforest, coastal vegetation and mature plantations. This bird can be found from Thale Ban NP down to Hala Bala Wildlife Sanctuary in Narathiwat

The IUCN lists the Orange-backed Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"


Greater Flameback

The Greater Flameback (Chrysocolaptes guttacristatus) also known as Greater Goldenback. The greater flameback is a large woodpecker, at 33 cm in length. It is of typical woodpecker shape, has an erect crest and a long neck. It always has unmarked golden-yellow to dark brown back and wings. The rump is red and the tail is black. The underparts are white with dark markings (chevrons, stripes, or bands), or light brown. The head is whitish with a black pattern, or it is yellow, brown or red. The straight pointed bill is long (longer than the head) and – like the legs and four-toed zygodactyl feet (two toes pointing forward, two backward. The adult male greater flameback always has a red crown. Females have a black spotted crown color. Its range in Thailand covers a large distance from the north to the south, mainly on the western side. A great place to find this woodpecker is Kaeng Krachan National Park. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Greater Flameback as being of "Least Concern"

Greater Flameback (Chrysocolaptes guttacristatus)

Common Flameback

The Common Flameback or Common Goldenback (Dinopium javanense) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found all over Thailand. Quite a large woodpecker, this species measures 28-32 cm in length. It has a flaming golden back and long, solid black moustachial stripes. Both sexes have black eyestripes joined to black rear neck stripe. Male has red crown, female has black crown. Black-scaled white underparts and red rump contrasting with black tail. Rather small bill, and only three toes on each foot. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forest, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, and subtropical or tropical mangrove forest. Moist secondary and open forest, open deciduous woodland, scrub, and mangroves, also found in teak forests. Breeding mostly May- June in Thailand. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Common Flameback as being of "Least Concern"

Common Flameback (Dinopium javanense)

Olive-backed Woodpecker

The Olive-backed Woodpecker (Dinopium rafflesii) is a species of bird in the family Picidae native to Southeast Asia. It is found mainly in southern Thailand. A largish woodpecker at 28cm in length. Very similar looking to flamebacks, but with an olive green back and a plain dull olive breast. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland, mangrove and montane forests; the species avoids clearings and secondary forest. This species is threatened by illegal deforestation due to the development of palm oil plantations and the deliberate targeting of primary forest wood.

The IUCN lists the Olive-backed Woodpecker being of “Near Threatened”


Rufous Woodpecker

The Rufous Woodpecker, (Micropternus brachyurus) is a brown woodpecker found across most of Thailand. It builds its nest within the nest of acrobat ants. It is a medium-sized (25cm), rufous-coloured woodpecker with a short crest and a short, weak and slightly curved black bill. It has black vermiculations on its rufous body and a dark eye stripe. The upper parts are finely barred black. The male has small red patches at the eyes. Breeding season is around May - June. This woodpecker can often be found at the higher levels of Kaeng Krachan National Park. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Rufous Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Rufous Woodpecker, (Micropternus brachyurus)

Buff-rumped Woodpecker

The Buff-rumped Woodpecker (Meiglyptes grammithorax) is a small (17cm) species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found mainly in southern Thailand, although it is regularly seen at Kaeng Krachan NP. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. Distinctive small, short-tailed, crested woodpecker. Male has short reddish malar patch; rest of head, chest and neck to upper breast greyish-brown with dense pale barring. Whitish buff lower rump. Primary forest and secondary forest, including swamp-forests; found in rather open coastal habitats. Breeding Mar–Jul. Nest-hole excavated as low as 2 m. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Buff-rumped Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Buff-rumped Woodpecker (Meiglyptes grammithorax)

Buff-necked Woodpecker

The Buff-necked Woodpecker (Meiglyptes tukki) is a small (21cm) species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found only in the deep south of Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps. It is threatened by habitat loss. Similar to buff-rumped woodpecker, only larger with narrower barring, plain head and plain buff neck patch.

The IUCN lists the Buff-necked Woodpecker being of “Near Threatened”


Black-and-buff Woodpecker

The Black-and-buff Woodpecker (Meiglyptes jugularis) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. Resident in varied areas across Thailand, its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and evergreen forest. It often shows a distinct preference for more open areas, such as edges and clearings. A small short-tailed woodpecker at 17–22 cm. Male has white hind neck, mainly blackish body with black and white barred tertials, a short malar stripe of dark red feather tips, often appearing barred red and black. Breeding March –June. A good place to find these birds is Kaeng Krachan National Park. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Black-and-buff Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Black-and-buff Woodpecker (Meiglyptes jugularis)

Bamboo Woodpecker

The Bamboo Woodpecker (Gecinulus viridis) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found mainly in western Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. A small woodpecker at 25–26 cm. The male has red crown to nape, rest of head buff-brown, tinged yellow, more golden-green on rear crown side and neck side, darker and browner on chin. Breeding is during April–May. Nest excavated at up to 5 m in bamboo, above a node. A good place to find these birds is Kaeng Krachan National Park.

The IUCN lists the Bamboo Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"


Greater Yellownape

The Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found across a large area of Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. A large (31 – 35cm), olive green woodpecker with prominent yellow-crested nape and throat. Dark olive green with grey underparts. Crown brownish and flight feathers chestnut barred with black. Breeding mostly March- May in Thailand. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Greater Yellownape as being of "Least Concern"

Greater Yellownape (Chrysophlegma flavinucha)

Lesser Yellownape

The Lesser Yellownape (Picus chlorolophus) is a type of woodpecker which is a widespread across much of Thailand. It is a largish species at 27 cm in length and has the typical woodpecker shape. The upperparts are green apart from the bright yellow tufted nape. The neck and breast are green and the belly is whitish, finely barred with green. The rump and tail are blackish. The adult male lesser yellownape has a green head with a white throat. He has red markings above the eye and above the nape, and red moustachial stripes. Females have only a red patch above the ear coverts. Its natural habitats are evergreen forest and moist deciduous forest, dry forest, woodland, bamboo, scrub and plantations. Breeding mostly March- May in Thailand. My picture here was taken at Huai Kha Kaeng WS.

The IUCN lists the Lesser Yellownape as being of "Least Concern"

Lesser Yellownape (Picus chlorolophus)

Crimson-winged Woodpecker

The Crimson-winged Woodpecker (Picus puniceus) is a species of bird in the woodpecker family. It is mainly found in the south of Thailand. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It can grow up to 25 cm long. Its diet is mainly insects and larvae. It is a bright and colourful bird that is hard to misidentify. Male has dark red forehead to hindcrown, olive greenish head sides, mantle and breast, an elongated crest of red feathers, yellow under crest and down to its nape. Female lacks red sub-moustachial stripe. Its natural habitats are evergreen primary and secondary forest with scattered tall trees, forest edge and secondary growth. Although this is mainly a southern species, it can also be found at Kaeng Krachan NP. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Crimson-winged Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Crimson-winged Woodpecker (Picus puniceus)

Laced Woodpecker

The Laced Woodpecker (Picus vittatus) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is a largish woodpecker (27 - 33cm) found throughout most of Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forest, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, subtropical or tropical mangrove forest, and subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. Male has red forehead to crown and short crest, bordered by thin black line; narrow white eyering and short supercilium; pale greyish cheek, olive breast and dark streaks on an olive whitish belly. Its natural habitat is deciduous forest, evergreen forest, secondary growth, bamboo, plantations, and village and suburban areas. Breeding around March – June. One of many good places to find the laced woodpecker is Kaeng Krachan National Park. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Laced Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Laced Woodpecker (Picus vittatus)

Streak-throated Woodpecker

The Streak-throated Woodpecker (Picus xanthopygaeus) is a species of woodpecker found in only a few places in western Thailand. A medium-sized, green woodpecker with streaked throat and scaly whitish underparts. Green above with yellowish rump, white supercilia and white and black moustache. Crown red in male, blackish in female. Tail dark and plain. Small, dark bill. Adult size around 30 cm. Its natural habitat is open deciduous forest, dry dipterocarp forest, also semi-evergreen and mixed forest. Possible sites for this woodpecker include Thap Lan National Park and Kaeng Krachan. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Streak-throated Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Streak-throated Woodpecker (Picus xanthopygaeus)

Streak-breasted Woodpecker

The Streak-breasted Woodpecker (Picus viridanus) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found from the western complex to the deep south of Thailand. Male has red forehead to nape and slight crest, black base of forehead, upper lores and narrow line bordering crown; thin white supercilium. From laced, by duller olive sides and throat and streaked throat and upper breast. Adult size around 30 - 33 cm. Its natural habitat is broadleaved evergreen forest, mangroves and coastal scrub. Commonly forages on the ground; also on moss-covered trees and boulders. Breeding around February – April. This bird can be found in Kaeng Krachan National Park to the south of Thailand. My picture here was taken at Ao Phang Nga NP.

The IUCN lists the Streak-breasted Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern

Streak-breasted Woodpecker (Picus viridanus)

Grey-headed Woodpecker

The Grey-headed Woodpecker (Picus canus), also known as the grey-faced woodpecker, is a largish (30 – 34cm) member of the woodpecker family, Picidae. It is found across most of Thailand. Its back and wings are greenish, underparts, neck and most of head greyish in colour, rump is yellowish green. Black eye stripe and moustache-like stripe on cheek. Mature males have some red colouring on their forehead. It prefers old mixed coniferous forest with a high proportion of dead trees, feeding primarily on ants. Good places to find this woodpecker are Kaeng Krachan NP and Huai Kha Kaeng Wildlife Sanctuary. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Grey-headed Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Grey-headed Woodpecker (Picus canus)

Black-headed Woodpecker

The Black-headed Woodpecker (Picus erythropygius) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found across most of Thailand. Adult size is around 33 cm. The male has black forehead, lores and cheeks to nape, red patch in centre of crown and sometimes down to eye, yellow throat with green upperparts. Female lacks red crown. Its preferred habitat is deciduous forest, especially dry dipterocarp, also pine forest. Usually found in small, noisy groups of 2–6 birds. Breeding during March–Jun. A great place to find this woodpecker is at Huai Kha Kaeng Wildlife Sanctuary. My picture here was taken at Huai Kha Kaeng Wildlife Sanctuary.

The IUCN lists the Black-headed Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Black-headed Woodpecker (Picus erythropygius)

Banded Woodpecker

The Banded Woodpecker (Chrysophlegma miniaceum) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found in the south of Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests and dense primary (dipterocarp) evergreen forest. The upper parts of the banded woodpecker are predominantly rufous-brown. The mantle is dull olive scaled with buff and the rump is yellow. The tail is chocolate-brown. The head is mostly rufous-brown with a shaggy yellowish nape. The chin, neck and throat are reddish-brown, the breast reddish barred with olive and the belly whitish, heavily barred with brownish-black. The sexes differ slightly; the male has a redder face and throat while the female's face and throat are browner, flecked with white. Adult birds are about 26 cm) long.

The IUCN lists the Banded Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"


Checker-throated Woodpecker

The Checker-throated Woodpecker, (Chrysophlegma mentale) is a species of bird (26 – 29cm) in the family Picidae. It is found in the south of Thailand. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland or montane forests, and the landward edge of mangrove forests. Male has dark green to olive forehead and crown, often rufous feather tips visible at side, elongated nape feathers bright pale yellow, yellow hind neck, upper breast plain, belly barred

The IUCN lists the Checker-throated Woodpecker being of “Near Threatened”


Great Slaty Woodpecker

The Great Slaty Woodpecker (Mulleripicus pulverulentus) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found across the much of Thailand. A unique and basically unmistakable bird, it is the largest species (45 – 51cm) of woodpecker that is certain to exist today. This species prefers to inhabit areas of primary semi-open, moist deciduous and tropical evergreen forest though can on occasion range into adjacent secondary forests, clearings with scattered tall trees and similar almost park-like areas but do not generally visit heavily disturbed areas. Locally, the great slaty woodpecker prefers sprawling stands of dipterocarp and teak trees. This unique-looking woodpecker has several obvious distinctive features: a very long, strong chisel-tipped bill, an elongated neck and a long tail. A slight crest maybe occasionally evident. This species plumage is almost entirely dark grey or blackish slate-grey overlaid with small white spots. The throat is paler grey and males have small red moustache. Great slaty woodpeckers are mostly seen in groups consisting of 3 to 6 individuals, which consist of a breeding pair and their young from prior years. My picture here was taken at Kaeng Krachan NP.

The IUCN lists the Great Slaty Woodpecker being of “Vulnerable”

Great Slaty Woodpecker (Mulleripicus pulverulentus)

White-bellied Woodpecker

The White-bellied Woodpecker or Great black Woodpecker (Dryocopus javensis) is large woodpecker of around 38 to 45 cm and is second in size only to the great slaty woodpecker among Asian woodpecker species. It is found across much of Thailand in various types of evergreen and deciduous forest. Male has deep red forehead to nape and crest, fairly broad red malar stripe; rest of head, entire upperparts, black and a white belly. Breeding usually around March – May. A great place to find these birds is at Huay Kha Kaeng WS. My picture here was taken at Huay Kha Kaeng WS.

The IUCN lists the White-bellied Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

White-bellied Woodpecker (Dryocopus javensis)

Pale-headed Woodpecker

The Pale-headed Woodpecker (Gecinulus grantia) is a species of bird in the family Picidae. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. Recent observations and several specimens reinforce probability that a narrow hybrid zone between the two exists in N Thailand and, presumably, N Laos. Proposed form aristus (NE India) synonymized with nominate; poilanei (Cochinchina, in S Vietnam) is inseparable from indochinensis. Three subspecies recognized. Another very informative article on this bird written by Phillip Round can be read here.. Please open in new tab. https://orientalbirdclub.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Gecinulus-woodpeckers.pdf

The IUCN lists the Pale-headed Woodpecker as being of "Least Concern"

Many thanks to Phillip Round for his kind permissions.

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